MARKET RESEARCH SURVEY PROJECTS CAN PAY FOR THEMSELVES

Our market research firm, TYG Marketing, is committed to providing our clients with research results that enrich their bottom line, both literally and figuratively.

By adding a couple of strategically planned questions at the end of a survey instrument, we are able to generate leads or produce income ideas for the client company, when converted, pay for the cost of the research study or more.

Here are some cases in point:

We conducted a market research telephone survey project for a tuxedo manufacturer with a sampling of their nationwide distributors. We suggested a value added question be added at the end of the survey whereby the distributors were asked if there were any products or items that their customers were requesting that were not available within the industry.  When we conducted an analysis of the survey research data, we discovered there was a demand for tuxedo shorts for ring bearers. The owner of the company asked one of his seamstresses to make up a pair of shorts, and she did so within fifteen minutes or so. They added the shorts to their product line and generated an additional 5% revenue in the following year.

When conducting a Net Promoter Survey to measure customer loyalty for a Credit Union, we suggested that a person who provided an answer within the Promoter rating scores be asked if  they could recommend a friend or family member in the market for a loan or who might be interested in becoming a member of the Credit Union. 25% of those respondents provided a name and phone number of a person who was interested in one and/or both of the offerings. Many of the leads converted, but it took only ONE loan conversion to pay for our services.

If you would be interested in further information, please visit our website at www.marketresearchfirmonline.com

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This entry was posted on Monday, August 2nd, 2010 at 2:38 pm and is filed under Customer Insight Studies. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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